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Enrico Tipton's avatar

Enrico Tipton

The Sustainable Loggers

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 145 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    8
    conversations
    with people
  • up to
    49
    organic meals
    consumed
  • up to
    1
    petitions
    signed

Enrico's Actions

Transportation

Locally-Sourced Meals

I will source 2 meal(s) from local producers each day this week.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Transportation

Advocate for Greener Vehicles

I will assess the vehicles used by my company or college and advocate for a purchasing policy focused on fuel-efficient vehicles.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Transportation

Try Carpooling

I will commute by carpool 5 mile(s) each day this week and avoid sending up to 19.76 lbs of CO2 into Earth's atmosphere.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Consumption and Economy

Personal Waste Audit

I will collect all of my unrecyclable, non-compostable trash to raise my awareness of how much I send to the landfill.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Consumption and Economy

Learn About Alternatives to the GDP

I will research alternatives (like Gross National Happiness) to measuring economic livelihood and the health of a nation.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Consumption and Economy

Watch a Documentary

I will watch one of the films suggested in the additional resources and discuss it with friends or family.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Consumption and Economy

Support a Sharing Economy

I will create or support a sharing economy with family, friends, and neighbors.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Consumption and Economy

Buy Only What I Need

I will not buy anything except items required for health and safety.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Water

Mulch the Base of Trees and Plants

I will prevent water runoff and increase absorbency.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Water

Install a Toilet Tank Bank

I will reduce the amount of water flushed and save up to 11 gallons (41 L) of water per day by installing a toilet tank bank.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

A Call to Sustainability

Talk To Others

I will tell 8 people why sustainability is important to me and what my vision for a sustainable world is.

Completed
One-Time Action

A Call to Sustainability

Research Local Organizations

I will learn what local organizations are working on sustainability issues and how I can get involved.

Completed
One-Time Action

A Call to Sustainability

Sign a Petition

I will sign petitions in support of an environmental or social initiative in my state.

Completed
One-Time Action

Food

Choose Organic Ingredients

I will enjoy 7 meal(s) cooked with organic ingredients each day this week.

Completed
One-Time Action

Feed


  • Enrico Tipton's avatar
    Enrico Tipton 5/04/2021 12:14 PM
    I was not able to complete most of the transportation challenges this week, due to having had knee surgery three weeks ago. That being said, I set the goal to carpool to the school everyday this week, instead of driving solo as I usually do. I did accomplish this goal, two of my football teammates and I rotate driving everyday and we plan on doing this through the rest of the school year. Also, I made it a goal to not drive anywhere this weekend and I accomplished that goal. 

  • Enrico Tipton's avatar
    Enrico Tipton 4/27/2021 8:55 AM
    Over this past week I kept a water journal to keep track of my water usage. Growing up in multiple states, I learned that not all tap water is the same. In some places, like a community I lived in in Arizona, the tap water was not trusted as drinking water. Where I happen to live now though, in Tacoma, I can use tap water for all of my needs including to drink. The fact that clean freshwater is so readily accessible to me and many others though, means we needs to be extra mindful of how much water we are using. I have to admit to being a huge contributor to over using, including; leaving the shower running, leaving the sink running while brushing my teeth, buying plastic water bottles, and the list goes on. Over this past week I have began to change that though, here is my progress: 

                Day one – Tuesday 4/20: This morning, before I finished the chapter on Water, I took a 20-minute shower and left the sink running while I brushed my teeth for two to three minutes. After I read the chapter and started this water journal though, I threw away the plastic bottle sitting on my nightstand and brought out my Hydro Flask.  

                Day two – Wednesday 4/21: I shortened my shower to 10 minutes, and made sure to turn the sink off while I was brushing my teeth. Also, I did some research on how much water humans should be drinking per day, and I found some alarming numbers. There are some suggestions like the one on the Mayo Clinic website that suggests “an adequate daily fluid intake is: About 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids a day. I used the word “alarming” before, because this is honestly an insane amount of water intake. My hydro is a 40 oz bottle, which is about 5 liters. I have to force myself to make sure I get through one full bottle a day, and you mean to tell me that I’m “supposed” to be drinking three of those. No way. It’s b.s. science like this that is allowing our capitalist society to be as destructive as it is. 

                Day three – Thursday 4/22: Today I kept my shower under 10 minutes and used even less water in my teeth brushing process. I also made sure my water intake was limited to my 40 oz Hydro Flask. 

                Day four – Friday 4/23: Again, kept my shower under 10 minutes and used as little water possible in my teeth brushing process. Kept my water intake limited, but I did have some soda. 

                Day five – Saturday 4/24: Took a longer then normal shower this morning, but still used minimal water when brushing my teeth. Drank very little water today but ate and drank many other unhealthy things which negatively contribute to our water issues. 

                Day 6 – Sunday 4/25: Kept my shower under 15 minutes, and minimal water use in brushing my teeth. I went through two hydro flask’s worth of water today, which to me is excessive. 

                Day 7 – Monday 4/26: Completely took away the shower in the morning, and instead substituted it with just putting some warm water in a towel and washing my face that way. Also, I reduced the amount of water I used when brushing my teeth by even more by only using a little water to wash my mouth out when I am done. Further, I reduced my water intake back to one Hydro.  


  • Enrico Tipton's avatar
    Enrico Tipton 4/26/2021 11:28 AM
    Water Discussion: 

    My local watershed is the Champers-Clover-creek watershed, which covers around one hundred forty-nine very unique square miles. It is unique because it actually sits in a depression between two big rivers. Due to this we don’t get any snowpack runoff, meaning there are no affects from snow runoff on our lakes and streams. This makes storm water very important in our watershed. Stretching from the town of Ruston, down south to DuPont, and east to Frederickson, this watershed contains seven municipalities, three military installations, and one drainage district, as well as Pierce County, that have jurisdiction concerning water quality. The major lakes include American, Spanaway, Steilacoom, Gravelly, and Tule. It also holds the major streams of Chambers, Clover, Spanaway, Morey, Murray, Flett, Leach, Puget and Peach. The watershed has a population of well over 410,000 people, which is more than 2,750 people per square mile. 

    Many of the current issues in the chambers-clover creek watershed are like many other human problems; self-made. Due to a very poor drainage system for storm water runoff (which is our most important source of water) we have both water quantity and water quality issues. The water quantity issues range from both spikes and major ground water flooding, but also times of lack thereof. When there is a lack of water though, it is usually more of a lack of clean water then a lack of water actually being present. Which gets me to the more important issue of water quality that plaques this watershed. With no connection with snow runoff, storm water and groundwater are essential freshwater sources, but these sources have been getting poisoned for years. Pavement, roofs, clearing streamsides of trees and plants, these are just a few of the many causes that have led to an increase in harmful pollutants in our waterways. Also, sediment issues from invasive plants/weeds, and algae blooms are big contributors to the poor water quality in this watershed. 

    Now, all that negativity being said, the human community in this watershed are ahead of many communities in trying to restore our water quality. There is actually a Chambers – Clover Creek Watershed Council. I was not able to find when this council was formed, but they have been active since at least 2018, helping Pierce county monitor and improve the water quality for both animals and humans. Over these past few years there have been numerous tree and plant planting projects near streams to try and help filter the stormwater draining into them. This is just one example of how individuals and groups have tried to start restore our watershed. Although it has not been limited to this and many other projects have taken place as well, larger systemic change needs to be taken. 

    My final note for this discussion is that I wanted to point out the language I used in this piece. I was referring to the watershed as “my” and “ours”. As someone who has native American blood running through my veins, I felt comfortable enough to use this language. But, that same blood is driving me to point out that these water rights are truly no ones but the original Native tribe who lived in this watershed. Americans came and stole this watershed and have now poisoned the water, poisoned the animals that rely on this water, and have completely reshaped this delicate ecosystem. This problem is not just limited to this tiny watershed though, it is now a world-wide problem. As I previously mentioned we need large systemic changes, and we need them quick.   



  • Enrico Tipton's avatar
    Enrico Tipton 4/26/2021 11:24 AM
    *Sorry this is so long and late* 
    This week (4/14 – 4/20) I kept a food journal to track my food consumption. I had two main goals for this week; how much I ate, and where the food came from. For my how goal, I wanted to keep my eating to twice a day. The second goal I had was to try and eat all locally grown or raised food. I had these goals because one of my key take-aways from this section in the reading, is that humans food consumption habits are one of the biggest drivers of how we spread pollutants. Starting to how food is made by the producers, all the way until after it leaves the consumers dinner table, the food chain that humans have created dumps pollutants on all levels (meaning producer, consumer, and everyone in between). If humans can change our eating habits back to the sustainable way humans used to, and in some places still practice, then we can save our planet.

    Day one - Wednesday 4/14: I wasn’t able to go shopping yet so I unfortunately ate a Dole banana for breakfast. It is healthy but having been grown internationally, I can only imagine how much pollution was caused just to get that banana to my house. Dinner was kind of more of the same as I had left over fajitas. I could only imagine between the beef, the peppers, and even the tortillas how much pollution happened before it got to my plate. So I failed in my second goal, but accomplished my first goal of only eating twice.

    Day two - Thursday 4/15: For breakfast I drove to my local Fred Meyers to see if they had any locally grown items. I wasn’t able to find anything that I would consider truly local, but I did find multiple types of produces that claim to be grown on the Eastern side of Washington. Apples from Wenatchee (of course), and onions from central Washington are just a couple of items currently in stock. I also tried to find locally grown meat but had to settle for just organic chicken. I ate one of the apples I bought in the morning, and cooked the organic chicken I bought with the locally grown onions on the stover, and put them over some white rice. So, today I accomplished 1.5 of my two goals. 

    Day three – Friday 4/16: For breakfast I ate one of the apples I bought yesterday, and caved in and had a piece of coffee cake from Starbucks when my mom offered. For dinner I grilled some of the chicken and made a chicken sandwich. Again, I only accomplished half of my goals. 

    Day Four – Saturday 4/17: Tried a new organic pancake batter and syrup for breakfast this morning, and both were very good. Although it wasn’t something locally grown, little steps like this are key to making big changes. For dinner I was at a friends house where they made chicken and beef tacos, both that I doubt were either locally grown or organic. Only accomplished one of two goals. 

    Day 5 – Sunday 4/18: Today I ate a very big unhealthy breakfast. So much pollution to get that meal to my table that I don’t even want to think about it. Didn’t eat the rest of the day. 

    Day 6 – Monday 4/19: Went back to having my locally grown organic apple for breakfast, but for dinner my mom made spaghetti and I couldn’t resist. I did stick to only eating twice today though which is one of my goals. 

    Day 7 – Tuesday 4/20: Apple for breakfast, and for dinner I tried a new vegan restaurant called Viva Tacoma. I got the “Bacun Brussel Sprout” and if you like brussel sprouts it was very delicious.